Non-Medical Cannabis Legalization

Summary Report with your feedback was provided to Town Council at the July 25, 2018 Committee of the Whole for consideration. You can read the Summary Report here, Non-Medical Cannabis July 2018 Public Engagement Summary Report

"On April 13, 2017, the federal government tabled two bills to legalize and regulate cannabis in Canada:

  • Bill C-45, An Act respecting cannabis and to amend the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act, the Criminal Code and other Acts (the "Cannabis Act").
  • Bill C-46, An Act to amend the Criminal Code (offences relating to conveyances) and to make consequential amendments to

Summary Report with your feedback was provided to Town Council at the July 25, 2018 Committee of the Whole for consideration. You can read the Summary Report here, Non-Medical Cannabis July 2018 Public Engagement Summary Report

"On April 13, 2017, the federal government tabled two bills to legalize and regulate cannabis in Canada:

  • Bill C-45, An Act respecting cannabis and to amend the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act, the Criminal Code and other Acts (the "Cannabis Act").
  • Bill C-46, An Act to amend the Criminal Code (offences relating to conveyances) and to make consequential amendments to other Acts.

The Cannabis Act create a regulatory framework for the production, distribution, sale, cultivation, and possession of cannabis across Canada. Bill C-46 addresses offences relating to cannabis trafficking, and focuses on strengthening impaired-driving measures." FCM Municipal Guide to Cannabis Legalization

Each level of government, Federal, Provincial/Territorial and Municipal have roles and responsibilities in implementing the non-medical cannabis legislation.

Summary of possible government roles and responsibilities are:

Federal

Provincial/Territorial

Municipal

  • Cannabis production
  • Cannabis possession limits
  • Trafficking
  • Advertising
  • Minimum age limits (18)
  • Oversight of medical cannabis regime, including personal cultivation registration
  • Wholesale and retail distribution of cannabis
  • Selection of retail distribution model
  • Workplace safety
  • Discretion to set more restrictive limits for:
  • Minimum age for consumption (19)
  • Possession amount
  • Zoning (density, location)
  • Retail locations
  • Home cultivation
  • Business Licensing
  • Building Codes
  • Nuisance
  • Smoking restrictions
  • Odours
  • Municipal workplace safety
  • Enforcement
  • Regulations around public consumption
  • Personal possession
  • Municipal cost considerations related to local policing


The time-frame for the legalization of non-medical cannabis to be effective is, October of 2018.

Local governments, such as the Town of Yarmouth will face significant new enforcement and operational challenges in the months and years ahead. New town policies, bylaws, business regulations addressing public consumption must be developed and will require co-ordination with our sister municipalities to ensure consistent provincial and regional approach.

Town Council at the June 28, 2018 Town Council Meeting approved the Community Engagement Plan seeking residents' concerns with the pending legalized retail sale and personal cultivation of non-medical (recreational) Cannabis.

You can participate in two discussion forums: (1) Growing non-medical cannabis at home, and (2) Cannabis in Public Places. You can also ask a question in the Q& A tab.





Discussions: All (2) Open (2)
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    The Province of Nova Scotia is legislating adults 19 years of age and older, will be allowed to grow up to a maximum of four plants per household. Federal law defines a household as a "dwelling house." There is no difference made between a detached house, or an apartment in a house or larger building, all are considered as a separate household or dwelling house.  It also includes any adjacent yard or garden where the plants could be grown outdoors.  No federal permit or licence would be required.

    What are you concerns around growing recreational cannabis at a resident?


    The Province of Nova Scotia is legislating adults 19 years of age and older, will be allowed to grow up to a maximum of four plants per household. Federal law defines a household as a "dwelling house." There is no difference made between a detached house, or an apartment in a house or larger building, all are considered as a separate household or dwelling house.  It also includes any adjacent yard or garden where the plants could be grown outdoors.  No federal permit or licence would be required.

    What are you concerns around growing recreational cannabis at a resident?


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    Public consumption of cannabis will be restricted by the Smoke-free Places Act. The Act currently prohibits smoking of any kind (including cannabis and vaping) in all indoor public places and workplaces, and in many outdoor spaces, including school and daycare grounds, bar and restaurant patios, and within four metres of an entrance or air intake.

    The Act will be updated to add more protections from second-hand smoke, including:

    • on or within 20 meters of playgrounds located in an outdoor public space
    • on or within 20 meters of a publicly owned sport and recreation event or venue, located...

    Public consumption of cannabis will be restricted by the Smoke-free Places Act. The Act currently prohibits smoking of any kind (including cannabis and vaping) in all indoor public places and workplaces, and in many outdoor spaces, including school and daycare grounds, bar and restaurant patios, and within four metres of an entrance or air intake.

    The Act will be updated to add more protections from second-hand smoke, including:

    • on or within 20 meters of playgrounds located in an outdoor public space
    • on or within 20 meters of a publicly owned sport and recreation event or venue, located in an outdoor public space
    • on and within nine meters of public trails
    • in provincial parks and on provincial beaches, except for within the boundaries of a rented campsite
    • in vehicles used as part of one’s job or work; this does not apply to a personal vehicle used for work purposes if they are the only person using the vehicle for work purposes (this applies to tobacco only – any use of cannabis in vehicles is prohibited).

    A person may be fined up to $2,000 for violating the Smoke-free Places Act.  There are no legislated restrictions on cannabis consumption in private residences.

    The Town has a  Smoking Bylaw that identifies specific locations where smoking is not allowed, that is in addition to the province's Smoke-free places Act.

    What are your concerns with public consumption of Cannabis (medical and non-medical)?   

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